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Village atheists : how America's unbelievers made their way in a Godly nation

Author: Leigh Eric Schmidt
Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, [2016]
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Leigh Eric Schmidt rebuilds the history of American secularism from the ground up, giving flesh and blood to these outspoken infidels, including itinerant lecturer Samuel Porter Putnam; rough-edged cartoonist Watson Heston; convicted blasphemer Charles B. Reynolds; and atheist sex reformer Elmina D. Slenker. He describes their everyday confrontations with devout neighbors and evangelical ministers, their strained  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: History
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Leigh Eric Schmidt
ISBN: 9780691168647 0691168644
OCLC Number: 944469328
Description: xix, 337 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Contents: The making of the village atheist --
The secular pilgrim; or, the here without the hereafter --
The cartoonist; or, the visible incivility of secularism --
The blasphemer; or, the riddle of irreligious freedom --
The obscene atheist; or, the sexual politics of infidelity --
The nonbeliever is entitled to go his own way.
Responsibility: Leigh Eric Schmidt.

Abstract:

"Leigh Eric Schmidt rebuilds the history of American secularism from the ground up, giving flesh and blood to these outspoken infidels, including itinerant lecturer Samuel Porter Putnam; rough-edged cartoonist Watson Heston; convicted blasphemer Charles B. Reynolds; and atheist sex reformer Elmina D. Slenker. He describes their everyday confrontations with devout neighbors and evangelical ministers, their strained efforts at civility alongside their urge to ridicule and offend their Christian compatriots. Schmidt examines the multilayered world of social exclusion, legal jeopardy, yet also civic acceptance in which American atheists and secularists lived. He shows how it was only in the middle decades of the twentieth century that nonbelievers attained a measure of legal vindication, yet even then they often found themselves marginalized on the edges of a God-trusting, Bible-believing nation. Village Atheists reveals how the secularist vision for the United States proved to be anything but triumphant and age-defining for a country where faith and citizenship were--and still are--routinely interwoven, "--Amazon.com.
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"This well-written and lively text will be of interest to both scholars and more general readers with an interest in American irreligion."--Publishers Weekly (starred review) "A felicitous, Read more...

 
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